Tag Archives: multiple representations

Addressing Multiplication as a Gap

There is a delineated sequence for teaching multiplication over the years, including repeated addition, set modeling, arrays, single digit etc (below). It exists to build conceptual understanding of the multiplication facts that are at some point memorized by many students. When I work with students who are a more than a year behind in the sequence for multiplication, I find that programming for these students to help them catch up sometimes involves shortcuts such as a reliance on rehearsal or resorting to use of the multiplication table in isolation. I am not against use of the table or narrowing the focus, but am promoting a more comprehensive approach.

Here is a sequence, on a Jamboard, I used for a recent student who was struggling for a long time with multiplication (explanation of each step shown below images). The student was interested in Minecraft so I used Minecraft items such as stone bricks and a wagon. I would spend as much time on each step, as necessary.

  • Count out the total number of stone bricks. This allows an assessment of how the student counts: by 3s or individually. If individually, I would prompt the student to count by 3s.
  • Add 3 + 3
  • Show a short video on the wagon (this adds interest and gives the students a bit of a break)
  • Present the bricks in 2 groups of 3, in context of 2 wagons with 3 bricks each.
  • Present the same problem as a multiplication problem but with the image for one of the factors in lieu of two numbers.
  • Use the multiplication table to skip count.
  • Present additional multiplication problems for independent attempts. The student completed both problems independently, without the table. For him this was a major success.

The follow up to this would be to assess his ability to do higher groups of 3s and groups of other numbers. For some students, I work on mastery of individual numbers before moving on. This builds confidence and allows for fluency in the process of skip counting out to the appropriate number. NOTE: I don’t worry about rote memorization of the facts but of fluency in the process of skip counting out the answers.

For students who are older, I sometimes recommend that the student be presented problems with visuals but then use a calculator to compute. This can develop conceptual understanding and also address the working memory and other related issues that undermine learning math facts.

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Information Processing Analogy – Big Picture

Effective instruction is effective because it addresses the key elements of how the brain processes information. I want to share an analogy to help adults (parents and educators) fully appreciate this.

Below is a model of information processing first introduced to me in a master’s course at UCONN.

Here is a summary of what is shown in the model.

  1. Our senses are bombarded by external stimuli: smells, images, sounds, textures and flavors.
  2. We have a filter that allows only some of these stimuli in. We focus on the ones that are most interesting or relevant to us.
  3. Our working memory works to make sense of the stimuli and to package it for storage. Our working memory is like a computer, if there is too much going on, working memory will buffer.
  4. The information will be stored in long term memory.
    • Some will be dropped off in some random location and our brain will forget the location (like losing our keys)
    • Some will be stored in a file cabinet in a drawer with other information just like it. This information is easier to find.

Here is the analogy. You are driving down the street, like the one shown below.

There is a lot of visual stimuli. The priority is for you to pay attention to the arrows for the lanes, the red light and the cars in front of you. You have to process your intended direction and choose the lane.

There is other stimuli that you filter out because it is not pertinent to your task: a car parked off to the right, the herbie curbies (trash bins), the little white arrows at the bottom of the photo. There is extraneous info you may allow to pass through your filter because it catches your eye: the ladder on the right or the cloud formation in the middle.

Maybe you are anxious because you are running late or had a bad experience that you are mulling over. This is using up band width in your working memory. Maybe you are a relatively new driver and simple driving tasks eat up the bandwidth as well.

For students with a disability that impacts processing or attention, the task demands described above are even more challenging. A student with ADHD has a filter that is less effective. A student with autism (a rule follower type) may not understand social settings such as a driver that will run a red light that just turned red. A student with visual processing issues may struggle with picking out the turn arrows.

Effective instruction would address these challenges proactively. Here is a video regarding learning disabilities (LD) that summarizes the need in general for teachers to be highly responsive to student needs. Here is a great video that helps makes sense of what autism in terms of how stimuli can be received by those with autism (look for the street scene). Here is a video of a researcher explaining how ADHD responds to sensory input (he gets to a scenario that effectively encapsulates ADHD).

To address these challenges:

Ironically, this is likely a lot of information for your brain to process…

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Introduction to Slope

which-jobSlope is one of the the most important topics in algebra and is often understood by students at a superficial level. I suggest introducing slope first by drawing upon prior knowledge and making the concept relevant (see photo above).  This includes presenting the topic using multiple representations: the original real life situation, rates (see photo above) and tables, visuals,  and hands on cutouts (see photos below).

10-dollars-per-hour-graphA key aspect of slope is that it represents a relationship between 2 variables. Color coding (red for hours, green for pay) can be used to highlight the 2 variables and how they interact –  see photo above and below.5-dollars-per-hour-graph

The photo below can be used either in initial instruction, especially for co-taught classes, or as an intervention for students who needs a more concrete representation of a rate (CRA). The clocks (representing hours) and bills can be left in the table for or cut out.cut-outs-hours-bills

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