Counting Out Value of Coins

Counting out the total value of a set of coins can be challenging for some students. A strategy to address this is a modified 100s chart with images of coins and decimal values.

Versions of handouts

There are 4 versions, listed in the order I used them with my students. I suggest you start with just pennies (less than 10) to acclimate them to the chart. Here is a video showing how to use chart.

  • dimes and pennies
  • nickels, pennies
  • dimes, nickels and pennies
  • quarters and pennies
FB Reel showing how it works or Youtube video

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UK Version

A request was made for a UK version. Below is the first iteration and may subsequently be revised. There are two versions: 1p 10p and 1p 5p 10p, both with 1 pound at the bottom for 100.

Jamboard

There is also a Jamboard version to allow you to work on this online. You have to make a copy of the Jamboard (see bottom image). (UK version – beta)

Make a copy to use the Jamboards.

Online Math Games

Here are a variety of online math game sites I have used over the years. Break is coming up for many districts. Maybe these can fill the void and allow some learning. Several address other content areas as well.

I have also used these games for break times at school to keep students working on academics.

If you have a child learning to count money, especially at an advanced age, there are some useful money games – especially ones with coins. I have students complete problems with actual coins then enter their response online.

https://www.abcya.com/

 

https://www.coolmathgames.com/

 

https://www.mathgames.com/

 

https://www.mathplayground.com/

 

https://mrnussbaum.com/math

 

https://pbskids.org/games/math/

 

roomrecess.comĀ 

 

http://sheppardsoftware.com/

 

https://www.splashlearn.com/

Data Collection for IEP Objectives

Here is an example of what data collection can look like. (The IEP objective should have been indicated on here as well.) It shows the data, any prompting from the teacher (P with a circle around it), notes and at the bottom is 3/9 for 33% correct.

Also note that I was working on finding the value of a set of nickels and pennies only before moving onto other combinations of coins and more coins.

data collecton for counting nps

Counting Out Total Value of Coins

The chart shown in the photo below was created and used by my former co-teacher and I to teach students in a high school life skills program how to count out the total value for coins (dimes, nickels and pennies). Here is how we implemented it.

  • The students are given a pile of coins, set next to this chart.
  • Students start with dimes (identifying dimes as the coin to start with is a prerequisite step that can be taught in isolation if necessary)
  • They line up the dimes in the dimes column as shown below.
  • They count out the total value of dimes (and can look at the number under the last dime)
  • Then the students identify the nickels as the next coin to use.
  • The place the first nickel in the nickels column, starting at the row below the dimes (you can use a highlighter to highlight the last dime row to scaffold where the student places the nickels)
  • Have the student count off 5 and place the next nickel (on the dimes column) etc.
  • Then follow the same steps to transition to pennies.
  • Have the student identify the total value by looking under the last penny.

coin chart

The idea is to fade the use of the chart and have the student count out the value without the chart. This is more possible if the task demand is incremented with pennies only, then dimes only, the pennies and dimes etc. Here is a link to handouts for those.