Tag Archives: adding

So Easy?!

Problems like the addition problem below are often viewed by adults as straight forward. This perception can make it difficult for adults, including teachers and even special education teachers to help students who struggle with it.

I find that the math teacher candidates and special education teacher candidates struggle with breaking down math topics, especially “easy” ones like the one below, into simple steps. To help students who struggle with math breaking down the math topic is imperative. The analogy I use is to break the topic down into bite-sized pieces like we cut up a hot dog for a baby in a high chair.

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For new teachers I use a formal task analysis approach to teach candidates how to cut up the math into bite-sized pieces. A task analysis for the problem above was an assignment given to a group of graduate level special ed candidates. As is common, they overlooked many simple little steps hidden in the problem. These steps are hidden because they are so simple or so automatic in our brains that we don’t think about them. See below for how I break this topic into several pieces or steps. For example, before even starting the addition the person doing the problem has to identify that 43 is a 2-digit number with 4 in the TENS place and 3 in the ONES place. Understanding that the problem is addition which entails pulling the numbers together to get a total (sum) is an essential and overlooked step. If a student struggles with a step the step can be addressed in isolation, as I show in another blog post.

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Addressing the Concept of Addition Part 2

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In a previous post I presented an approach to teach and assess the concept of addition. This document shows all the steps I use including the one shown in the photo above.

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Assessing the Concept of Addition

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Teaching students to add appears to be a very linear, skill driven endeavor. Hidden in this is the concept of what it means to add and how to assess this conceptual understanding. Here is an approach to address and assess the concept of adding.

In the photo above a student is prompted to pull both groups into 1 pile (see photo below). The word, add, is not addressed. The symbol is absolutely not introduced yet.

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Once the student has demonstrated a consistent performance of pulling the groups into 1 pile (addition) two other tasks are introduced, taking away and sorting. The student is presented each of these individually (field of 1).

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After showing consistent performance in demonstration of these skills, the skills are then presented using a generalized mat (see below).

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Then two skills as pairs. First  “pulling together” and “taking away” are randomly prompted individually, e.g. “pull into a pile” using the generalized mat above. Then combine “pull together” and “sort” then “sort” and “take away.” Finally all 3 are randomly chosen (field of 3).

 

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