In lieu of a school having to make technology available for vast numbers of kids it is possible to use personal technology. The apps identified here can be useful in a math course.

Polls would allow personally relevant data collection and could lead to modeling opportunities (not on the runway, models like linear functions).

Plinky would allow a high tech version of an exit slip.

Group Tweet would allow collaboration on a project and provide details for a student who is absent. You could match kids with kids at another school…maybe another country!

I would love to field some input from readers.

TeachBytes

twitter-logo-birdIt seems like people have mixed feelings about Twitter: to use or not to use? I personally believe in the use of Twitter to grow personal learning networks, and I understand the capabilities for literacy learning it provides to students who are already familiar with the micro-blogging tool. While Twitter by itself provides some great opportunities for collaborative learning with students, there are a number of apps that enhance that process.

Here are five of the most useful ones I have found:

  1. PollDaddy – allows users to create polls and post them easily on Twitter for other users to take (polls can be either multiple choice or open-ended)
  2. Outwit Me – source of hundreds of fun and intelligent games like hangman, trivia quizzes, word scrambles and puzzles, and more that users can play via Twitter responses
  3. Plinky – posts a new writing prompt or challenge question each day that…

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